Black Women Teach: Electoral Perspectives from Black Women Electeds

Black Women Teach: Electoral Perspectives from Black Women Electeds

Session Type(s): Panel

Starts: Friday, Aug. 3 9:00 AM (Central)

Ends: Friday, Aug. 3 10:15 AM (Central)

Room: 208/209

Fri 9am: Black Women Teach: Electoral Perspectives from Black Women Electeds

Black Women Teach: Electoral Perspectives from Black Women Electeds

Posted by Netroots Nation on Friday, August 3, 2018

Since November 2016, there has been an increase of women candidates across the country. Come engage with decorated elected officials and hear what the political process has entailed for them. All of the panelists will have served at least one term in their respective state legislature and will come ready to share and answer any questions that you may have about their process. As we head into an unprecedented election season, it’s important that we continue to collectively share the resources that enable progressives to take over GOP controlled seats and win at every level.

Moderator

Michelle Wright

michelle.wright

Michelle Wright is a community organizer, and rabble-rouser. She was forced from the sidelines into battle after the passage of Prop 8 , the National Equality March and Meet in the Middle, a statewide call to action for LGBT activists in 2008. These landmark events ignited a passion for equality within her that fueled her decision to come out to family and friends.

Additionally, she intermittently trains across the country on Public Narrative with the New Organizing Institute. She is proud to call Oakland home.


Panelists

Rep. Park Cannon

Park Cannon is the youngest member of the Georgia House of Representatives. She is excited to represent Midtown, Old Fourth Ward, Downtown, and Southwest Atlanta. At the 2016 Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Representative Cannon said “We need to trust black women!” and will continue to stand up for queer visibility in the south.”

my website


Leslie Herod

Leslie Herod

Representative Leslie Herod was elected in 2016 as the first LGBTQ African American in the Colorado General Assembly. Since then, she has passed 68 bills, addressing criminal justice reform, mental health, addiction, youth homelessness, and civil rights protections. Some of her signature work includes: ending cash bail for minor offenses, de-felonizing drug possession, giving every Colorado newborn a $100 college kickstarter account, providing free menstrual hygiene products to inmates in Colorado’s prisons and jails, and passing a comprehensive police accountability bill following the highly public murder of George Floyd, and the nationwide movement that followed.

In addition to winning reelection in 2018, Herod championed a ballot initiative—Caring for Denver—that raises $35 million annually for mental health and substance abuse treatment and services for children and adults. Herod is the Chair of the House Finance Committee, Vice Chair of the House Judiciary Committee, Chair of the Committee on Legal Services, and the Chair of the Colorado Black Democratic Legislative Caucus.

Other sessions: LGBTQ Women Out to Win


Rep. Renitta Shannon

renitta.shannon

Newly elected to the Georgia State House of Representatives, Renitta is an active community organizer and leader around economic, gender and racial justice issues. She has been active with the Fight for $15 campaign and was previously the Executive VP of Georgia’s National Organization for Women chapter. Since college, she has excelled in business development through out her professional career in the healthcare industry.

my website


Emilia Sykes

Emilia Sykes

Born and raised in Akron, Emilia Strong Sykes was elected to represent her hometown in 2014. An accomplished legislator, Sykes has passed several bills into law, including HB1 which allows victims of dating violence to obtain civil protection orders, saving lives and helping victims to live without fear of their abuser. In her third term, Sykes was elected by the Democratic Caucus to serve as Ohio House Minority Leader, where she led the caucus in passing more Democratic-sponsored bills than the previous two General Assemblies combined, delivering real results and working to restore the Ohio Promise for all Ohioans.