How the Next President Can Bust Up Big Corporations

How the Next President Can Bust Up Big Corporations

Session Type(s): Panel

Starts: Saturday, Jul. 16 9:00 AM (Central)

Ends: Saturday, Jul. 16 10:15 AM (Central)

Room: 224

The next Democratic president may face a Republican Congress. Some say nothing can get done. Yet, lots can be done by using existing executive powers that were granted as far back as 1890 but are under-utilized today. Antitrust law is a top power the next president can use. On the campaign trail, candidates have talked about breaking up Too Big to Fail banks. Across America, hundreds of once-competitive markets for goods and services are now controlled by a few firms, feeding economic inequality and hindering entrepreneurship, innovation and price and wage competition. Top experts will lay out a blueprint for the next president to use antitrust law as a game-changer in the economic lives of millions.

 

Moderator

Sarah Miller

Sarah has spent more than a decade in Washington D.C. working on policy development and strategic communications from the vantage points of campaigns, advocacy organizations, and the federal government. She served Chief of Staff of economic policy group Better Markets, as the policy director for Governor Martin O’Malley’s presidential campaign, was a senior advisor and speechwriter at the Treasury Department, worked as a policy advisor and speechwriter for John Podesta during his leadership at the Center for American Progress, and served as a policy staffer on Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign. Sarah graduated from the University of Chicago in 2004 and originally hails from Muskogee, Oklahoma.


Panelists

David Dayen

David Dayen

David Dayen is the executive editor of The American Prospect magazine. He is the author of Chain of Title: How Three Ordinary Americans Uncovered Wall Street’s Great Foreclosure Fraud (2016), winner of the Studs and Ida Terkel Prize, and Monopolized: Life in the Age of Corporate Power (2020), released in July. His work has also appeared in The Nation, The Intercept, The New Republic, Vice, HuffPost, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, and more. He has been a guest on MSNBC, CNN, Bloomberg, CNBC, NPR, and Pacifica Radio. He lives in Los Angeles.

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Lina Khan

Lina Khan writes about industry consolidation and its political economic effects, including the connection between market structure and democracy, and the evolution of antitrust law. She is currently a fellow with the Open Markets Program at New America and with the Information Society Project at Yale, and is pursuing a J.D. at Yale Law School. Lina previously researched market consolidation across sectors at New America and served as policy director for Zephyr Teachout during her 2014 gubernatorial bid in New York. Before that she was on a journalism fellowship in Delhi, India, where she reported on a grassroots political movement built around transparency legislation and the right to information.


Barry C. Lynn

Barry C. Lynn is a pioneer in writing about America’s new monopolies, and the dangers they pose to our liberties, democracy, communities, and national security. Lynn is author of Cornered: The New Monopoly Capitalism and the Economics of Destruction and End of the Line: The Rise and Coming Fall of the Global Corporation. Lynn’s work has been profiled in the New York Times, The Financial Times, The New Yorker, and on CBS. His articles have appeared in Harper’s, Harvard Business Review, and Foreign Policy. Lynn directs the Open Markets Program at the New America think tank in Washington.


Sarah Miller

Sarah has spent more than a decade in Washington D.C. working on policy development and strategic communications from the vantage points of campaigns, advocacy organizations, and the federal government. She served Chief of Staff of economic policy group Better Markets, as the policy director for Governor Martin O’Malley’s presidential campaign, was a senior advisor and speechwriter at the Treasury Department, worked as a policy advisor and speechwriter for John Podesta during his leadership at the Center for American Progress, and served as a policy staffer on Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign. Sarah graduated from the University of Chicago in 2004 and originally hails from Muskogee, Oklahoma.


Zephyr Teachout

Zephyr Teachout

Zephyr Teachout grew up in a farming community just a few hours from Dutchess County, where she lives. She is a national leader, speaking up against the corruption of our political system by special interests and big corporations. Just before running for Congress she was even writing a book about the small business economy.

For her entire career Zephyr has been fighting for people who have been shut out– and gotten results. She was the first National Director of the Sunlight Foundation, a non-partisan organization that works to make Congress more open and transparent. After the crash of 2008, she helped start an organization to break up big banks who had become “too big to fail” and have damaged our small businesses.

Zephyr is a reform-minded leader who has never been afraid of standing up to powerful special interests and the political establishment, even members of her own party. In 2014, she ran against the Governor because of the corruption in Albany. Her grassroots campaign shocked political insiders when she garnered 35% of the vote, including majorities across the counties that make up NY-19.

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