Stingrays, Drones and Fusion Centers: Coming to a Police Department Near You?

Stingrays, Drones and Fusion Centers: Coming to a Police Department Near You?

Session Type(s): Panel

Starts: Saturday, Jul. 18 1:30 PM (Mountain (no DST))

Ends: Saturday, Jul. 18 2:45 PM (Mountain (no DST))

Room: 222 AB

The first leaked NSA document published by the media shocked many‚Äîbut not everyone. Pervasive surveillance of communities of color and activists isn’t new. But recently, the use of surveillance and military technology by local law enforcement has gotten more attention, especially in light of demonstrations in cities across America. From fake cell phone towers to automated license plate readers to new methods for bringing sources of surveillance together, millions of dollars are being spent on surveillance technologies‚Äîoften in the face of opposition and with the help of federal grants. This panel will cover what this technology is, how it’s making its way to streets across the country, how it affects racial profiling and free speech, and what communities are doing to fight its implementation. We’ll also touch on possibilities for change at the federal level.

Moderator

Nadia Kayyali

Nadia Kayyali is a member of EFF’s activism team. Nadia is particularly interested in surveillance, national security policy, and the intersection of criminal justice, racial justice, and digital civil liberties issues.

Nadia previously served as the 2012 Bill of Rights Defense Committee Legal Fellow where they worked with grassroots groups to restrict the reach of overbroad national security policies. They earned their B.A. from UC Berkeley, where they majored in Cultural Anthropology and minored in Public Policy. They received their J.D. from UC Hastings.

Nadia currently serves on the board of the National Lawyers Guild S.F. Bay Area chapter, and as a volunteer at the San Francisco Tenants Union.

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Panelists

Brandi Collins-Dexter

Brandi Collins-Dexter

Brandi Collins-Dexter is the Senior Campaign Director at Color Of Change and oversees the media, democracy and economic justice departments. She has led a number of successful campaigns for accountability including getting Fox’s The O’Reilly Factor taken off the air; getting R. Kelly dropped from RCA for his repeatedly abusing girls; winning Net neutrality protections; pressuring financial companies to pull funding from hate groups; and persuading Disney not to whitewash the features of their character Princess Tiana.

Brandi is a regular commentator in the media on racial justice. The Hill named her a 2017 “person to watch.” She has written for The Root, The Hill and ESPN’s The Undefeated, and has been featured on the BBC, and in the Guardian, Gizmodo and Pitchfork.

Other sessions: Progressives' Role in the 2016 Primary Debate

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Tessa D'arcangelew

Tessa D'arcangelew

As an organizer on the ACLU of Northern California Tech & Civil Liberties team, Tessa leads the campaign to help cities and counties adopt ordinances that create mechanisms for transparency, accountability, oversight and meaningful community input when considering surveillance technology. Several major cities and counties in California are currently working to adopt such an ordinance.

Prior to joining the ACLU-NC, Tessa worked as a Field Assistant for the Yes on Prop 34 Campaign – a statewide movement to replace the death penalty with life in prison without the possibility of parole. She also managed a political canvassing office for a range of international aid organizations. In 2008, she worked on President Obama’s re-election campaign in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Tessa also worked as a Programming Assistant at the Intercultural Community Center and as a DJ for student radio at Occidental College. She graduated cum laude with a B.A. in Diplomacy and World Affairs.